"the lawyers have been at it" [REIG] 

As you've no doubt observed, if you've seen anything of the news of the past few days, the "Free Sherlock" case has concluded, with the plaintiff emerging victoriously. It's been big news, getting coverage in such circles as The New York TimesThe GuardianThe Hollywood ReporterThe Wall Street Journal and scores of other publications.

As a listeners of our program know, Leslie S. Klinger, BSI ("The Abbey Grange") has been a frequent guest on the show, joining us for a two-part interview on his role as consultant to the Robert Downey, Jr. films, and then again talking about his Annotated Dracula work. Of course, Les is also the lead plaintiff on the lawsuit in question. You can read some background to this here ("Don't Imagine That You Can Bully Me" [CHAS]) and listen to one of our most popular episodes wherein we took up the question Who Is a Sherlockian?

We were once again joined by Les, who outlined the background of the case and discussed some of the legal aspects of copyright that have led us to this juncture. We try to keep the discussion as interesting as possible for the lay people out there, and Les even manages to bring in the 1903 coronation of Edward VII as part of the case law history.

As if landing an interview with the lead plaintiff in the case weren't enough, we also managed to sit down with Betsy Rosenblatt, BSI, ASH ("Lucy Ferrier"), who is not only a second generation ASH and BSI, but also a legal scholar who just happens to specialize in intellectual property law (how fortunate is that?). Betsy touches on some additional points that will undoubtedly be of interest.

While we weren't able to find an Editor's Gas-Lamp per se, we used a bit of scholarship presented at the annual meeting of the Speckled Band in 1992 by the (now) late Joseph Merriam. We've included here as a bonus.

 

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Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock.

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Direct download: ihearofsherlock_freesherlock.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 5:47pm EST

"We both thought the best resource" [SCAN]

We can unabashedly say that we're huge fans of Sherlockology. So it was with great pleasure that we sat down with Jules Coomber and David Mather, two of the four (in addition to Emma and Leif) who run the burgeoning online presence of a site that pays homage to the BBC's Sherlock and the cast and crew that are responsible for it. It's been so well done that many think that it's either an official BBC site or that it's only about the show.

Go with us behind the scenes to understand who these energetic and fascinating people are, what brought them to Sherlock Holmes, what keeps them committed, the relationships they've forged with the creators and staffers of the show, and some behind-the-scenes commentary about how this is all done. And please don't forget to visit Sherlockabilia, the online shop run by these enterprising people. All of the proceeds go back into running the site, which is purely a labor of love.

Technically, this qualifies as our Christmas episode, which is entirely appropriate, as Series 3 of Sherlock gets its world premiere on December 15 and the show hits the wider public on January 1. Along with these gifts, we reference our review of "The Blue Carbuncle" last year at this time, so that's well worth your time. In addition, for those who have downloaded the official I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere app on Android and iOS, we have an extra audio treat for you that you may find of interest.

Of course, we cover some nuggets of current events and news - mostly around the premiere of Sherlock and its anticipation, a reference to our Weekly Links Compendium (so lovingly compiled by Matt Laffey), the growth of the Sherlock Holmes Community and our well laid-out Flipboard magazine.

Our gas-lamp this week comes from the 1959 Baker Street Journal Christmas Annual and is titled "Christmas with Sherlock Holmes." We wish you the compliments of the season.

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock.

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Direct download: ihearofsherlock059.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:24pm EST

"We must be thankful for what we've got." [VALL] 

For those in the United States, November is the month in which we celebrate Thanksgiving. We thought it a fitting time to reflect on some of the things we have to be thankful for in the world of Sherlock Holmes, and they are many. The show's multiple topics and many links reflect that.

First, we have our Sherlockian society meetings. Whether you live in a city that is home to a venerable institution with a decades-old group of longstanding tradition or a town with a relatively new group, the autumn seems to be a time when meetings are held, toasts are recited and friendships rekindled. And if you haven't yet listened to Episode 4: Sherlockian 101 and Episode 5: Sherlockian 101 (part 2), in which we discuss getting involved in or starting your own society, we highly recommend it.

We're thankful of the work of Mr. J.D. Sutter, who helped us to transition the site from its years-old layout and to integrate content from the Baker Street Blog, to give the site its full functionality you see now. If you have a chance, get over to JD's site and thank him for his work.

It would be an understatement to say we're thrilled to have Matt Laffey's Weekly Sherlock Compendium Links back on the site again. After a brief yet unintentional hiatus, Matt's comprehensive links are back with us again.

We discuss the annual Baker Street Irregulars Weekend, including some of the changes afoot within the BSI itself. The BSI Press is getting dedicated leadership, with its many titles in print and on the way; the BSI Trust is also getting new leadership.

We're very fortunate to live in a time when news of Sherlock Holmes fills the airwaves, print publications and intertubes, and we cap off a few of them. There's PBS, BBC, and Doctor Who news from the world of television, we remember Jeremy Brett, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's Sherlock Holmes exhibition is open, and we acknowledge a number of anniversaries of Sherlock Holmes films.

We share listener comments, both written and audio, note the inaugural issue of The Watsonian, and highlight the continued spirited debate about Elementary.

It's also the season for renewing subscriptions to The Baker Street Journal (one of our sponsors). We're issuing a related challenge: from now through March 2014, we're looking for 50 gift subscriptions of the BSJ to be made by our listeners. Listen to the show for full details.

Our gas-lamp this week: since our reading on Episode 56 was "On Advocating Sherlock Holmes" and Brad Keefauver was our guest, we thought it might be appropriate to read one of Brad's own editorials ("Zismanian scholarship?") as our gas-lamp for this episode, marking the very first time we've used an online publication as our reading.

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal. Don't forget to get your free audiobook download with your trial membership from Audible, at audibletrial.com/sherlock

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Direct download: ihearofsherlock058.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:49pm EST

"No ghosts need apply." [SUSS] 

Holmes and the occult is our subject for this Halloween episode of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere, and we're joined by editor and author Charles Prepolec, who together with J.R. Campbell edited Gaslight Grimoire: Fantastic Tales of Sherlock HolmesGaslight Grotesque: Nightmare Tales of Sherlock Holmes, and Gaslight Arcanum: Uncanny Tales of Sherlock Holmes, joins us to talk about the intersection of Sherlock Holmes and the spooky, outre and creepy, setting the tone for the season.  Charles (who goes by @sherlockeditor on Twitter), had the great fortune to work with the likes of Barbara Hambly, Martin Powell and Kim Newman, among others, and he talks about the selection process for including authors and their works in the anthologies.

Of course, Conan Doyle was no stranger to writing ghost and horror stories, and his Professor Challenger series dealt with such fantastical subjects as dinosaurs. We take Charles on a tangent and begin discussing the ideal Hollywood actor to portray the professor.

Charles has contributed to Sherlock Magazine, Scarlet Street and Canadian Holmes and is a longtime Sherlockian, having been a member of the Singular Society of the Baker Street Dozen in Calgary for 20 years and a Master Bootmaker of the Bootmakers of Toronto in 2006. He spends his days at the Movie Poster Shop in Calgary and reading voraciously. 

Our gas-lamp is not a Gas-Lamp at all, but rather an introduction by to a collection of Conan Doyle stories, as written by John Dickson Carr.

Links:



Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

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Direct download: ihearofsherlock057.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:25am EST

While our show normally allows us to inform our listeners about the Sherlockian world (and occasionally share gossipy tidbits and commentary), it is always a joy when we have the opportunity to welcome a guest to interview.

This occasion was no exception, as we were fortunate enough to be joined by Brad Keefauver, BSI ("Winwood Reade") from Sherlock Peoria. Brad fashions himself as more of a writer, but he certainly held his own on our program, as he discussed his first meeting with Sherlock Holmes, noting that it was far from typical. It was theatrical in nature, but you'll have to listen to hear the exact work that captured Brad's attention. We were then off and running into the sci-fi world of Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein and others, with Brad openly admitting his Trekkie origins (not that there's anything wrong with that).

A class trip to Chicago brought him in touch with Beyond Baker Street and helped him realize that there was a world beyond the pastiches and films that he was most familiar with. Noted Irregular hermit Bob Burr ("The Rascally Lascar") was an mentor of sorts, and it was his editing and clockwork-like work ethic that led to some of Brad's early written contributions, such as The Elementary Methods of Sherlock Holmes and The Armchair Baskerville Tour. Other giants like John Bennett Shaw, BSI ("The Hans Sloane of My Age") and his legendary symposiums in the 1980s also led Brad to Irregular life. There is so much more that we could say about Brad, as he is a veritable Sherlockian onion. We'll let the show speak for itself.

The show also covers a number of relevant news items and places for your attention; you'll find them all in the links section below. As always, we closed with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp, this time selecting "One Advocating Sherlock Holmes" from the March 1987 issue (Vol. 37, No. 1). While the topic and some of the pronouncements may be controversial, we like to think that we found some common ground in it.

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

Direct download: ihearofsherlock056.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:40pm EST

It's a show chock full of Sherlock Holmes news!

Of course, Horace Harker was a reporter for the Central Press Syndicate in "The Six Napoleons," but in our case we're acting in his stead to share some of the most significant news to our own syndicate. We share a special announcement about a future feature of the program which we'll call "The Central Press Syndicate." But in the meantime, we have much to share...

We pick up with a clarification on Lenore Glen Offord ("The Old Russian Woman") and tell you all about the 2011 Baker Street Journal Christmas Annual, in which readers will be able to discover the many aspects of this intelligent and well-published writer. We also question what Investitures looked like under Edgar Smith's and Julian Wolff's time - particularly the presentation of the shilling as a medal. There's an opportunity for your feedback.

Speaking of feedback, we're happy to share a good deal of listener mail and commentary from Episode 54. Thank you for all of your input and intelligent observations. We also note that we've added a function to the site called Speakpipe, which allows our listeners to provide an audio comment directly from the web page while listening to the show. We hope you'll use it.

Over on our Facebook page, every week our fans have a chance to join in the fun with our Wacky Caption Wednesdays. A lineup of some of the recent ones include the iconic image of Holmes hunched over his chemical set and the comparison to Mentos; and Holmes springing to action in "The Speckled Band" with inspiration from DEVO.

On the news front, we have items from the next season of "Sherlock" from BBC One, and news from Steven Moffat that there's a clue that everyone missed with regard to Sherlock Holmes's death. And the announcement of the next installation of the absolutely phenomenal set of events called From Gillette to Brett that look at Sherlock Holmes of the screen. Also events-wise, while we missed the Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Place conference in Minnesota, we'll be featuring a report from the #SHMN13 goings on.

For topics more controversial, we have the latest goings-on around the so-called "Free Sherlock" lawsuit between Leslie Klinger and the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd., which indicate that a summary judgment is being requested, with the decision due in the coming weeks. And the mid-year letter from the Baker Street Irregulars' Wiggins, Michael Whelan contains a reprint of "The World of Sherlockians" that was shared on the BSJ website

Finally, we concluded with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp on the importance sparking plugs, this time choosing September 1982 (Vol. 32, No. 3). In it, you'll find the definitive and seminal phrase as to what it takes to establish a Sherlockian society.

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

Direct download: ihearofsherlock055.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:39pm EST

It's easy to assume that Sherlock Holmes's powers were something of an anomaly - that Holmes was a superhero with something akin to super powers, and we mere mortals cannot attain the same level of expertise and professionalism. But that assumption would be wrong, as author Maria Konnikova has made abundantly clear.

In her book Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes, Konnikova, who holds a doctorate in psychology from Columbia University and writes the "Literally Psyched" column for Scientific American, deconstructs the process of observation, deduction and self-knowledge. In doing so, she gives the reader concrete examples of how to approach the fabled scientific method, along with the psychology behind the process.

While we have previously reviewed her book, our conversation with Maria in this episode took personal turns and got us much deeper into the creative process, her inspiration, and even a back story to Holmes that gave him these powers.


In addition, we covered topics from the ridiculous to the sublime such as movie trailers and voice overs, storytelling, suggestions for getting your fix of Sherlock Holmes news links and more. We also discussed the need to merge this site and the Baker Street Blog and put out a call for assistance from those with technical programming aptitude to help us with the migration and site upgrade. We also asked for feedback on our process, frequency and topics of the show - we'd love to hear from you!

Finally, we concluded with a reading of the Editor's Gas-Lamp, this time choosing the most recent entry from the Summer 2013 (Vol. 63, No. 2).

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

   

Direct download: ihearofsherlock054.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:41am EST

The Baker Street Irregulars are widely known as a literary society dedicated to the study of Sherlock Holmes. Since 1934 the group has been gathering in New York City for its annual dinner and weekend festivities and has embarked on a significant publishing effort centered around its own historyinternational Sherlockian societies' scholarship, and analysis of extant manuscripts of the Canon.

But more than that, the BSI wants to ensure that its own history and that of its members are recorded for posterity and the researchers who may be interested in it sometime in the future. Enter the Baker Street Irregulars Trust.

In this episode, Burt and Scott interview Tom Francis, BSI ("The Imperial Opera at Warsaw), who is the Chair of the Trust. Tom helps us understand how and why the Trust was established, what its aims are, and how you can help this august institution. We discuss some of the holdings of the Houghton Library at Harvard University, where the Trust is housed, including the H.W. Bell collection - Bell having been an early Sherlockian scholar and member of The Speckled Band of Boston.

The BSI Trust is a nonprofit organization as a subset of the Baker Street Irregulars. Donations are welcome, but original materials are more desirable. Correspondence of Irregulars and their other papers are welcome - but the Trust does is not interested in everything Sherlockian or related to all Sherlockian societies. Books and other items that are not a core part of the Trust typically go up for sale or auction.

Tom breaks ground as he utters a phrase never before heard on this program - tune in to find out exactly what that is - and even begins to delve into what the future of the Trust looks like in our digital/electronic times.

Links:

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

Direct download: ihearofsherlock053.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:18pm EST

When a figure like Sherlock Holmes has been around for over a century, there are bound to be misconceptions that creep into public thinking. We blame this not on carelessness or laziness but rather on the overwhelming popularity of the great detective.

The image of Holmes clad in deerstalker and Inverness cape, clenching a Meerschaum pipe in his teeth is the universal, if cliched, image of a detective. But was it true?

We were recently reminded of a number of classic myths about Sherlock Holmes, thanks to a contest being sponsored by The Baker Street Journal (also a sponsor of our program): it has long been rumored that men wore black armbands throughout the city of London after reading "The Final Problem" in the Strand Magazine. And only anecdotal evidence has been referenced whenever this supposed fact is brought up. The BSJ is offering a free year's subscription to anyone who can definitively prove that such mourning attire was worn in response to the death of Sherlock Holmes.

That got us to thinking: what other Sherlockian myths are there? And are we guilty of propagating any of them ourselves? Join us for a quick game show-style question and answer session on the topic, as well as a reading of your comments from our last show and some recent news from the world of Sherlock Holmes.


The Editor's Gas-Lamp: Rather than the traditional gas-lamp, which began under Edgar Smith's editorship of the Baker Street Journal, we thought we would mark May 5 as the 123rd anniversary of Christopher Morley's birth by reading two of his poems: the very short "The Secret" and the quite remarkable "Toulemonde."

Links:




 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 60.2 MB, 1:05:42)

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Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323). Connect with us on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us mumble their hallowed names on the show: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

Direct download: ihearofsherlock052.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 7:53am EST

Episode 51: Who is a Sherlockian?

We thought we'd stir up the discussions a bit and try to get to the bottom of a couple of controversies that have been roiling the world of Sherlock Holmes enthusiasts (we're careful to say neither "fans" nor "devotees" at this juncture).

The first item of interest that grabbed our attention in early 2013 was the so-called "Free Sherlock" movement. Summed up, this is basically an issue that is being brought to court via a case titled Klinger vs. Conan Doyle Estate, in which Leslie Klinger, BSI ("The Abbey Grange") is contesting the Conan Doyle Estate's claim that any new content that contains Sherlock Holmes must pay a royalty or license fee to the Estate. Burt and Scott parse through some of the non-technical/legal aspects of the case and discuss what's at stake.

Speaking of being at stake, the other item on the docket is the debate as to what in fact constitutes a Sherlockian of good standing? That is, can one have arrived at the doorstep of 221B Baker Street via the BBC series (or Granada, or Universal, etc.) or must one have been schooled only in the printed literature and dress the part of a 1940s joiner? It's quite a debate - one that was taken up vehemently by The Baker Street Babes earlier this year, after the "Elite Devotee Redux" was published in recently resurrected  Saturday Review of Literature. We offer our own humble observations on the matter.

For those who wish to subscribe to the publication and read all of the very interesting articles therein, you may procure a copy by sending $5 postpaid to Donald K. Pollock, 521 College Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14305. An image of the cover and inside cover can be seen below.


The Editor's Gas-Lamp: We purposefully revisited the same Gas-Lamp (Vol. 3, No. 2, OS) that we shared on Episode 15, because Edgar Smith's "Who is a Baker Street Irregular?" seemed to strike the same chord some 65 years later.

Links:

Direct download: ihearofsherlock051.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:23pm EST