"the compliments of the season" [BLUE]

 

 

 

 

As you know, December 27 marks "the second day after Christmas," the day on which Dr. Watson called up on Mr. Sherlock Holmes to wish him "the compliments of the season"in "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle."

 

 

We've long celebrated that particular story on this date with a poem of our own - even opting for reading it on an unnumbered special episode in 2007. But  rather than simply rehash the tried and true, we thought we'd mix things up a bit this year and bring in a guest.

 

 

Peter Blau, 2s., BSI ("Black Peter") has been with us previously (on Episode 6 and Episode 7), so we'll spare the full introduction. We asked Peter on as our very special guest in order to tell the story behind his very unusual Sherlockian decoration: a Sherlock Holmes-themed set of ornaments - each inspired by one of the original 60 stories. He regales us with the challenges involved in trying to identify these ornaments without a copy of the Canon handy.

 

 

Each year at his tree-trimming party, Peter challenges newcomers to identify each and every ornament - and we can attest that many are head scratchers. Here we have images of a handful of the ornaments, as well as the tree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you'd like to see additional ornaments, you'll find them on the the IHOSE apps for AndroidiOS, or Windows.

 

 

Peter also tells us about his paper written some 40 years ago in which he describes the true story behind how a cropless animal such as a goose could have a carbuncle hidden in its crop.TL;DR: it comes down to a typo - an 'o' substituted for an 'a.'

 

 

We close this episode with an audio Gas-Lamp: inspiration taken from our interview with Bert Coules (Episode 68 and Episode 69): a clip from the BBC Radio version of "The Blue Carbuncle" that hits at the core of the relationship between Holmes and Watson.

 

 

 

Links:

 

Many more links are available in our Flipboard magazine and Scoop.it page, as well as on the The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (with over 2,100 members), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course,  are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

 

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunesSoundcloudStitcher or Spreaker and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

 

--

Direct download: ihearofsherlock072.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:07am EDT

Episode 71: A Conversation with the Head of the BSI

 

 

Mike Whelan is the "Wiggins" of the Baker Street Irregulars and has been such since 1997. He joined us as a guest on I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere first in December 2007 (Episodes 14 and 15).

 

As a reminder, the Baker Street Irregulars, the literary society dedicated to Sherlock Holmes, was founded in 1934 by Christopher Morley, administered ably from 1940-1960 by Edgar W. Smith, followed by Julian Wolff from 1960-1986 and Tom Stix, Jr. from 1986-1997.

 

In our conversation with Mike, we touch on both Julian and Tom, both of whom Mike knew. We go behind the scenes at the Regency, where Mike's first BSI dinner was, as well as on the succession process that he underwent prior to ascending to the top leadership position in the BSI. As one might expect, a new leader brings new vision, and Mike's included reclaiming the Irregulars' literary roots, extending a hand internationally and honoring the memory of Conan Doyle.

 

As any good leader, Mike has been tireless in his efforts to communicate with his stakeholders (in this case the members of the Baker Street Irregulars), doing so through two annual letters. We parsed through the major themes in the 2014 mid-year letter: decentralization, BSI conferences, the next phase of the BSI Trust, and the society's "soul" - that is, its values, which we think are worth calling out here:

 

  • Promote and nurture Grand Game scholarship
  • Diverse, exceptional membership, not elitist
  • Kind, welcoming clubbability 
  • Altruistic volunteerism -- giving more than you receive, "society above self" 
  • Joyful, whimsical environment (see last January's annual dinner) 
  • Aspirational, not reactionary 
  • Inherent modesty versus taking ourselves too seriously
  • Extremely high standards -- never intentionally settle for less 
  • Fiscally responsible -- sufficient funds maintained to accomplish most, if not all, objectives 
  • Societal and member Sherlockian charitable generosity

 

Burt and Scott go on the public record with an intention for the future (it's up to you, dear listener, to hold us to it!). And Mike gives a preview of what you might expect at the 2015 BSI Weekend.

 

Finally, we discussed the very handsome Undershaw Set - a limited edition signed by the authors and in a purple slipcase with gold stamping. The proceeds from sales of the sets will go to the Undershaw Preservation Trust, an organization dedicated to preserving and restoring the unique home designed and built by Arthur Conan Doyle. [Editor's note: we previously covered this news here.]

 

The Undershaw Set from the Baker Street Irregulars Press

 

Make sure you tune in to our sponsor reads to hear Scott tell his story about Douglas Wilmer (the subject of the 2014 Baker Street Journal Christmas Annual) that references this famous scene:

 

 

 

The Editor's Gas-Lamp comes from the Vol. 4, No. 1 issue in 1949, but is not a Gas-Lamp per se. Instead, it is a poem by Paul McPharlin: "Sweet Auburn," which puts one of the original Sherlock Holmes stories to verse.

 

 

Links:

 

Many more links are available in our Flipboard magazine and Scoop.it page, as well as on the The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (with over 2,100 members), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course,  are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunesSoundcloudStitcher or Spreaker and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

 

--

 

Direct download: ihearofsherlock071.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:52am EDT

Episode 70: Sherlockian Jeopardy

 

 

This. Is. IHOSE!

 

 

In our 70th episode, we've joined forces with three of the formidably intelligent Baker Street Babes to create a Sherlockian version of the popular American game show Jeopardy. To say that it was one of our most technically challenging episode yet would be a massive understatement. But we hope you find that it was pulled off with aplomb.

 

 

LyndsayAshley and Ardy faced off against each other with Burt and Scott filling the role of Alex Trebek in what could be summed up as "the nervous tutor, the careless servant, and the three enterprising students."

 

 

In our version, the game revolves around the Canonical references in the BBC's Sherlock. Five categories span the first five episodes of the series and are titled: Pink Profile, Myopic Money, Profound Past-time, Steamy Scandal, and Horrible Hound and range from $100 to $500 in the first half and $200 to $1,000 in the second half. Each contestant rings in with a unique audio signature:

  • Lyndsay "Ahhhhhh" [Irene Adler's text message notification planted on Sherlock's phone.]
  • Ashley "I'm a big fan." [Kitty Riley's greeting to Sherlock in the men's room.]
  • Ardy "Not your housekeeper." [Mrs. Hudson's retort to Watson]

 

 

With Burt's occasional difficulty with the question formulation and Lyndsay's inability to recall that Jeopardy contestants are required to respond in the form of a question, it was as much high comedy as it was a quiz show. Not to mention the Edwardian-era quiz show music we chose. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

 

 

And in a surprise move, Burt and Scott received the ultimate honor: after being put to four questions, each was named an honorary Baker Street Babe!

 

 

We wrap up with listener comments and our contest winner from Episode 69.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Links:

 

 

More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (now at nearly 2,100 members), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

 

--

 

 
Direct download: ihearofsherlock070.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 12:22am EDT

Episode 69: Sherlock Holmes on Radio, Part 2

Michael Williams and Clive Merrison as Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes

 

 

 

In Episode 68, we explored some of the early days of Sherlock Holmes on radio with Bert Coules. We're pleased to present the second part of that episode as we make a deeper dive into Sherlock Holmes as portrayed in radio productions.

 

The bulk of our conversation with Bert centers - appropriately so - around the BBC Radio 4 series starring Clive Merrison and Michael Williams (Amazon US | Amazon UK). After selling a dramatized version of The Hound of the Baskervilles to the BBC (which starred Roger Rees), Bert was given the green light to dramatize all 60 Sherlock Holmes stories, serving as the head writer.

 

Sherlock Holmes - A Merrison or a Paget?
The striking resemblance between Sidney Paget's Sherlock Holmes (r) and Clive Merrison in the role (l).

 

 

Bert discusses the casting of the new series, including what was required in a Watson that was an equal partner - and a zinger aimed at Nigel Bruce - as well as the increased comfort felt by the characters and actors over the course of the series recording.You may be surprised to learn how the stories were assigned to the writing team (a scientific method from the BBC, no doubt) and how the writers were "imaginatively faithful" to the stories. Not to mention the backstory behind an alternative ending to "The Solitary Cyclist."

 

 

 

Of particular interest for us in this show is a multitude of sound clips from the BBC series - including the music that played such a prominent role in so1me episodes. We did a bit of our own sound design in this episode in keeping with the spirit of the theme.

 

We also discuss some of the more intriguing guest stars on the series, such as Peter Sallis, Desmond Llewelyn, Brian Blessed and Tom Baker, as well as the "new" Watson during The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Andrew Sachs. Bert has a great story about how he ended the series in a manner than ensured it will not be continued.

 

 

 

CONTEST ALERT: This episode contains a contest. 

We mentioned Denis Quilley and Patrick Allen as two actors who have been in the BBC Sherlock Holmes radio shows (as Bob Carruthers [SOLI] and Leon Sterndale [DEVI], respectively) and who have also been guest stars in the Granada series (as Leon Sterndale [DEVI] and Col. Sebastian Moran [EMPT], respectively.

 

There are at least two other actors who have also had guest starring roles in each series. The first individual who emails us the names and their respective roles and stories in each series will win a copy of Bert Coules' book, 221 BBC: Writing for the World's Only Complete Dramatized Canon and Beyond.

 

Merrison, Thorne, Matheson, Williams, Hartly - the Baker Street Regulars
The Baker Street Regulars - recurring members of the cast (L to R): 
Clive Merrison (Holmes), Stephen Thorne (Inspector Lestrade), 
Joan Matheson (Mrs. Hudson), Michael Williams (Watson), 
John Hartley (Mycroft Holmes).

 

 

 

Our Gas-Lamp this episode, we return to The Baker Street Journal of January 1952 (Vol. 2 No. 1 (New Series)) for Edgar Rosenberger's poem "Four Ages," representing the evolution of Sherlock Holmes as portrayed by various actors.

 

 

 

Links:

 

 

 

More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (now at over 1895 members!), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

 

--

 

     

Direct download: ihearofsherlock069.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 3:02am EDT

Episode 68: Sherlock Holmes on Radio, Part 1

 

Sherlock Holmes has a rich history on radio, beginning in the 1930s and running clear through to the 2010s. From William Gillette to Basil Rathbone, Cedric Hardwicke to John Gielgud, and Carlton Hobbs to Roger Rees.

 

But there is one production that stands heads and shoulders above the rest. The BBC Radio 4 series starring Clive Merrison and Michael Williams managed to do what no other production had done before it: to dramatize all 60 Sherlock Holmes with the same principal cast members.

 

 

The head writer behind the project was Bert Coules, and Bert is our guest for a very special two-part series examining the history of Sherlock Holmes on the radio, with a particular focus on the BBC series. In this interview you'll not only hear Bert's origins with Sherlock Holmes, but you'll also be treated to excerpts from some of the productions throughout the 20th century.

 

And for those of you paying attention, there is a money quote about Nigel Bruce buried within.

 

In addition to our conversation with Bert, we also get to some very important housekeeping, including announcing the winners of the Tom Richmond print and pen from Episode 65.

 

Our Gas-Lamp this episode comes to us courtesy of Bert Coules himself, from the original edition of 221 BBC: Writing for the World's Only Complete Dramatized Canon and Beyond, as we read the Introduction. The updated and revised edition (via the link) is available now from Wessex Press.

 

 

Links:

 

 

More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (now at over 1895 members!), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

Direct download: ihearofsherlock068.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:04pm EDT

 


Well, we've done it. We've finally produced a mega-episode. And what better topic to go all epic on you than the outsized Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries? Our guest this episode is Tim Johnson, Curator of Special Collections and Rare Books & E. W. McDiarmid Curator of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries.

Tim gives us a nice history of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota and the beginnings of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the university, which was made possible through a number of personal relationships. It includes the additions from the collections of James Iraldi, Philip Hench, Edith Meiser, John Bennett Shaw and Allen Mackler that have contributed to the basis of the vast and varied items that number more than 60,000.

The giant Sherlockian, John Bennett ShawWe discuss much about the collections, including the challenge for a curator of books / librarian when it comes to looking after objects that go far beyond the printed page, as well as the changing nature of donor relations with respect to special collections.

But we would have been remiss if we didn't spend time on John Bennett Shaw, BSI ("The Hans Sloane of My Age"), who was affectionately known as The Grand Acquisitor and who had all of the collecting discernment of a vacuum cleaner.

Tim opines on what's next for collectors and the Collections alike, and gives us a hint as to what to expect as far out as 2016. If you're a researcher or just a curious Sherlockian, there is much available to you, either on a visit to the library or to their site online.

Scott shares a tale of collecting woe - a long sought-after treasure disappears in the blink of an eye. What's a collector to do?

We head way back to an early edition of the Baker Street Journal - 1946, to be exact - to find our inspiration in "De Jure Inter Gentes" (Vol. 1, No. 3).

Links:


More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting "Save As..." or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 50.4 MB, 1:49:58)


Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.


--

Direct download: ihearofsherlock067.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:55pm EDT

Episode 66: Get Your Kicks with Sherlock Holmes

A general store on Route 66 featuring "a little Ford" [LAST]

It's summertime and the Sherlocking is easy! In our 66th episode, we travel down the road with the top down and enjoy the sites and news along the way.

 

Our breezy conversation ranges from hockey and snow (it's Christmas in July!), which sends us down a rabbit hole of snow in the Canon, to the latest in the #FreeSherlock movement, and then on to some events.

 

But the real fun begins when Burt and Scott investigate the various iterations of Sherlockian tchotchkes that give us kicks as Sherlockians. As it happens, our little show and site focuses on the intersection of Sherlock Holmes and popular culture, so our dueling top 10 lists should bring a smile to your face.

 

What did we miss? What would you add to the lists that we started? Let us know with a comment tagged #IHOSE 66.

 

Speaking of hashtags - don't forget the contest we mentioned in Episode 65. You have until August 30 to enter for a chance to win the Tom Richmond print of the 8 Sherlock Holmes portrayals.

 

Our Gas-Lamp this time is "A long, long trail a-winding" from the Spring issue of 2014 (Vol. 64, No. 1) of the Baker Street Journal.

 

Finally, Burt shares news of his talk at a local library - perhaps serving as a model for like-minded Sherlockians in other communities to do the same.

 

Links:

 

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex PressThe Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

 

Bonus Content:

Avid listeners who stay with us for the entire episode will be treated to a little extra something.

 

 

Image credit: Harry Pherson (Flickr)

--

Direct download: ihearofsherlock066.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:49pm EDT

Episode 65: Art in the Blood

 

After a slight delay (thanks to a crashed hard drive and a lost interview), we're back with a super-sized episode that we hope will make up for our absence.

 

We're pleased to welcome Tom Richmond, one of the "Usual Gang of Idiots" at MAD Magazine. Tom's career has been a most interesting one, and we explore how he managed to take an adolescent aspiration and turn it into an award-winning career at the bible of comedic publications.

 

During this show, you'll find out how inspiration comes to a creative type who works in his basement of his Minnesota home; the role of Batman and Superman in Tom's career development; how Tom first came to meet Sherlock Holmes (hint: we've had his muse on the show previously). A good deal of the program will be related to art, comic art, caricature and the visual aspect of Sherlock Holmes, which should interest a Sherlockian art collector like Jerry Margolin, who was on IHOSE #16.

 

Speaking of collecting, you may have noticed the image at the top of this show's entry. That lovely piece of work - "The Game is Afoot!" - is available as a limited edition print. Tom talks about his previous experience with Dr. Who and James Bond prints and how he came to select the eight actors to represent Sherlock Holmes on this print. If you'd like to purchase one, Tom's site has a limited run of 450 for just $25 (cheap).

 

Your chance to win big!

In addition to giving you the opportunity to purchase one of Tom's prints, we have a listener contest in which you could win one of these highly coveted prints (plus one other special item we mention in the show). How can you make yourself eligible to win? Well, you'll just have to listen to the episode and discover where we lay out the rules. [But it does involve the hashtag #IHOSE65.] The contest is open until August 30, 2014.

 

 

A few listener comments - including one that appeared as a message in a bottle (see below) - graced our inboxes this time around.

   

  

 

 

We selected an original Gas-Lamp to perfectly complement the show: "Art in the Blood," from Vol. 8, No. 2 (April 1958) of the Baker Street Journal.

 

Links:

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex PressThe Baker Street Journal - and one additional surprise sponsor this time around that we think you'll enjoy.

 

Bonus Material 

If you happen to subscribe to our program via our IHOSE Android app, our IHOSE iOS app, or our IHOSE Windows app, we occasionally throw in bonus content to justify the $1.99 or so that the app stores charge for it. In this case, we've given you a PDF with each one of Tom's Sherlock Holmes characterizations on its own page.

 

--

 

    

Direct download: ihearofsherlock065.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 1:40am EDT

Episode 64: Sherlock Holmes in Translation

Don Hobbs, BSI ("Inspector Lestrade") aka "The Maniac Collector"

 

 

After a long hiatus, we're back in the Collectors' Corner. This time, we're joined by the Maniac Collector himself, Don Hobbs, BSI ("Inspector Lestrade").

 

For those of you who don't know Don, you're in for a treat, for Don is a Texan through and through - and that means big stories, a big appetite for his interests and a big BIG collection of Sherlock Holmes books in translation. Of the 100 languages that the Canon has been translated into, Don has books in 96 of those languages. And that's only part of his 11,000 book collection. As a world traveler, he stays in touch with his network of connected individuals to keep him up to date on new pieces for his collection.

 

The Hound of the Baskervilles in Occitan

 

Don is also the general editor for the BSI International Series, which to date has included scholarship from Japan, Scandinavia, Australia and Italy. Future volumes include Spain and Canada, to name two.

 

Tune in to hear about Don's inspiration, his favorite among all of his foreign editions, where he first encountered Sherlock Holmes, how collecting has affected his life, the most amazing collections he's seen of other Sherlockians, and advice for future collectors.

 

In lieu of our Gas-Lamp, we asked Don to read one of his previous entries in the Maniac Collector's Inbox - #333 from October 19, 2008, titled "The Anti-Peter Principle."

 

Links:

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

 

Bonus Material

Don's library (click to enlarge)

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

--

Direct download: ihearofsherlock064.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 11:11pm EDT

Episode 63: Irregular Stain

Irregular Stain: the manuscript of "The Adventure of the Second Stain" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Baker Street Irregulars Manuscript Series has another entry, and once again we find ourselves chatting with co-editors Robert Katz, MD, BSI ("Dr. Ainstree") and Andrew Solberg, BSI ("Professor Coram"). Bob and Andy of course were our guests on Episode 50: A Golden Passage, and we're delighted to have them with us again to share the secret as to how lightning strikes twice and these two fine editors regroup to wrangle together scholarship, research and fun for our Sherlockian edification.

 

This time, the BSI Manuscript Series title is Irregular Stain, and it treats the reader to a full-color reproduction of the manuscript of "The Adventure of the Second Stain" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. What's more, we even get some high-resolution Sidney Paget artwork that gives more detail of Sherlock Holmes than most readers have seen before.

 

Join us for this chat with Bob and Andy as we discover the origins of Sherlock Holmes and Haverford College, the secret meaning of the code words "apple pie," and the possible contributor whose unfamiliar handwriting is abruptly seen in the middle of the manuscript. And be the first to know what the next entry in the BSI Manuscript Series will be.

 

The Gas-Lamp this episode is inspired by a letter written by Vincent Starrett to Edgar Smith mentioned in the Preface of Irregular Stain, which appeared as "A Perspective on Scholarship" in the January 1953 Vol. 3, No. 1 (New Series) edition of The Baker Street Journal.

 

Links:

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

 

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

 

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal.

 

 

--

Direct download: ihearofsherlock063.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 6:00am EDT